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What is the cheapest way to visit Lallybroch ?

Buy Lallybroch throw pillows online

What is the cheapest way to visit Lallybroch From Edinburgh ?

Visit Lallybroch Castle ( Midhope Castle ) for just £90 . Hourly service from Edinburgh between 10 am and 2 pm . Free pickup and dropoff from Edinburgh. Add two more Outlander film locations – Fort William and Wentworth prison –  for a unique tour costing just £150 . Phone 07305-294773 for details and availability.

See Jamie Fraser’s ancestral home – Lallybroch .

Need a bit more Outlander ? Listen to Jamie as he guides you around Castle Leoch ( Doune Castle ) on our Jamie Fraser Outlander tour

Midhope Castle, a 16th-century tower house, is used as Lallybroch (also known as Broch Tuarach) in Outlander . Left to Jamie by his parents, Brian and Ellen, Lallybroch is also home to Jamie’s sister, Jenny, her husband Ian Murray and their children. With Lallybroch being an important part of the Outlander story, much use is made of Midhope Castle. Phone (+44) 0131-549-9785 for details and bookings .

On this tour you can visit Jamie Fraser’s ancestral home – Lallybroch Castle .

Also available from April 2020 – Lallybroch tours – visit Lallybroch, Fort William, Hopetoun House and Wentworth Prison on our unique Outlander tours – from £200 .

Lallybroch Castle tours can be booked on +447305-294773. In just half an hour from Edinburgh you can be at Jamie Fraser’s ancestral home .

Toll free number 1-866-233-2644 or online .

Perhaps the greatest mystery in Outlander is the actual location of the standing stones at Craigh na Dun

Outlander tours from Edinburgh     

 

What castle is used for Lallybroch ?


Real life Midhope Castle is used as Lallybroch in Outlander .  Lallybroch (also known as Broch Tuarach in Gaelic ), Midhope Castle is a 500 year old tower house located on the Hopetoun estate near Abercorn, a few miles west of South Queensferry, and about half an hour from Edinburgh . Lallybroch tours are available . Lallybroch gifts , including stickers, throw pillows and t-shirts , can be bought online

Can you actually visit Lallybroch ?

Visiting Lallybroch
Lallybroch castle has become a bit of a tourist attraction nowadays and it features on Lallybroch tours . You can access Lallybroch / Midhope Castle  , a 500 year old tower house located on the Hopetoun estate from the outside . You can knock on the door and see if Jamie’s there . The inside of the castle is derelict and blocked off . Lallybroch gifts , including stickers, face masks, throw pillows and t-shirts , can be bought online

Are Lallybroch tours from Edinburgh available ?

yes, you can book Lallybroch tours from Edinburgh . It takes about half an hour to travel to Lallybroch . Edinburgh is one of the great cities of the world with millions of visitors a year. Check our our Edinburgh hotels guide .

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Did Jamie just give a clue about the standing stones ?

Outlander Actor Sam Heughan has written the foreword to an excellent book “There’s always the hills ” by Cameron Mcneish , in which he gives a little clue about the location of the famous standing stones

” We had been filming Outlander near Loch Rannoch for a few days, among the magical setting of standing stones that the main character Claire travels through, back to Scotland in 1745. I had spent my 35th birthday on the side of a mountain, filming a ‘picnic’ in the driving rain and fog, and even the bannock we had to eat was soggy. Dreich and damp as we were, it felt momentous, remarkable even, the ever-changing summit of Schiehallion standing like an extinct volcano, cloud continuously

masking then briefly revealing her sharp peak, the magical backdrop to our scene. I looked towards where I knew our crew would be working, at least a kilometre down, in the valley. The wind was getting stronger but the snow had eased. As if in answer, the cloud briefly parted allowing me to see down the long sweep of the valley to a silver-grey loch in the distance. I could make out the circle of trees that marked the location of the standing stones, the cherry picker cranes carrying the enormous lights that pretend to be a dim Scottish sun. I even spotted a few black figures, unrecognisable in wet weather gear, moving slowly around. The crew would be cold and wet and only halfway through their day and I felt so fortunate to have the time off. As quickly as they had parted, the clouds closed again and I was alone. It was time to get down, in case the weather got worse and I lost my way.”