Outlander Jamie , actor Sam Heughan , meets Holly Willoughby on This Morning

HOLLY Willoughby could barely contain her excitement as she met Outlander actor Sam Heughan on today’s show.

The This Morning presenter, 37, is a huge fan of the hit TV show, in particular the hunky star, who plays Jamie Fraser in the series.

Outlander news brought to you by Private Outlander tours .

 Holly Willoughby was smitten with Sam Heughan

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Holly Willoughby was smitten with Sam Heughan

Squealing with delight, she told him: “I will try and control myself!”

She then proceeded to ask him a series of questions about the upcoming fourth series, while Phillip Schofield sat back, clearly amused.

At the end of the interview she stood up as Phillip took a picture of them – unable to hide huge smile.

Holly gushed: “So nice to meet you.”

Those watching at home found the whole interaction very funny and took to Twitter to comment on it.

 Phillip took a picture of them after the interview

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Phillip took a picture of them after the interview
 Holly had a lot of questions for her favourite actor

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Holly had a lot of questions for her favourite actor 

One person wrote: “Holly’s dream just came true and Phil had to drag out a photo with Sam Heughan #ThisMorning.”

Another added: “Love watching Holly fan girl over @SamHeughan . To be fair he is an absolute dream 😍 #ThisMorning.”

While someone else Tweeted: “#thismorning Holly, wipe the dribble off your lip you.”

 Sam has played the role in Outlander since 2014

SONY PICTURES TELEVISION
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Sam has played the role in Outlander since 2014

 

 The actor is best known for his role in Outlander

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The actor is best known for his role in Outlander

Sam, 38, is a Scottish actor best known for his role in Outlander, which he joined in 2013.

The show, which is based on a series of  bestselling novels by Diana Gabaldon,  follows Jamie’s romance with the World War II nurse Claire Randall (Caitriona Balfe) as she travels back in time to 18th century Scotland.

Outlander star Sam Heughan heads for the hills in Take a Hike on BBC Two Scotland

Outlander star Sam Heughan has headed for the hills in his latest TV appearance.

He explains his love of the great outdoors to Cameron McNeish for Take a Hike on BBC Two Scotland.

The actor, who grew up in Dumfries and Galloway, said it was a passion which had been with him as long as he could remember.

He said that returning to Scotland to film Outlander had rekindled his desire to enjoy its countryside.

Sam HeughanImage copyrightGETTY IMAGES
Image captionHeughan said filming for Outlander in Scotland had made him “fall in love” with the country

“I was born and raised in a place called New Galloway, on the grounds of a derelict castle,” he said.

“It was a great childhood.

“I know I am very fortunate but I got to be outdoors all the time with my imagination and play a lot out there – I think that’s probably where my love of acting came from.

“The whole area was kind of my play park where there were really no boundaries and I think that discovery and excitement as a kid definitely has transferred into why I like coming to remote places.”

The return to his homeland for his acting career took him back to those memories.

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Where did Sam Heughan grow up?

New GallowayImage copyrightBILLY MCCRORIE
Image captionThe town is on the edge of the Galloway Forest Park

New Galloway lies on the west side of the valley of the Water of Ken a mile north of the end of Loch Ken in Dumfries and Galloway.

It is largely built around a single north-south High Street that climbs up through town and has a location on the edge of the Galloway Forest Park that gives it a “wonderful air of seclusion”.

The town as seen today dates back to planned development by Viscount Kenmure in the early 1600s, followed by the granting of burgh status in 1630.

But settlement in the area goes back much further with nearby Kenmure Castle fought over in the late 1200s.

Source: Undiscovered Scotland

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Sam Heughan
Image captionThe actor said his childhood in New Galloway had inspired both his acting and his love of the outdoors

“I moved back to Scotland to shoot Outlander and go to all these amazing locations all over Scotland and it made me fall in love with the country that I knew from my childhood,” he said.

His first climbing experience as an adult was not such a success when he slipped and fell on Ben Lomond.

However, he said that was part of the excitement for him

“I think the challenge of climbing is certainly a part of why I do it,” he said.

“It’s like you’re an adventurer, you’re maybe the first person to ever be here and that’s what I love about the mountains.

“You can get to them quite easily and before you know it you feel like you’re the first man to ever climb here.

“To me, it’s something inside you, something inside your bones, it’s a real connection to the land.”

Take A Hike – A History of Scottish Walking is on BBC Two Scotland on 16 May at 19:00.

Did Jamie just give a clue about the standing stones ?

Outlander Actor Sam Heughan has written the foreword to an excellent book “There’s always the hills ” by Cameron Mcneish , in which he gives a little clue about the location of the famous standing stones

” We had been filming Outlander near Loch Rannoch for a few days, among the magical setting of standing stones that the main character Claire travels through, back to Scotland in 1745. I had spent my 35th birthday on the side of a mountain, filming a ‘picnic’ in the driving rain and fog, and even the bannock we had to eat was soggy. Dreich and damp as we were, it felt momentous, remarkable even, the ever-changing summit of Schiehallion standing like an extinct volcano, cloud continuously

masking then briefly revealing her sharp peak, the magical backdrop to our scene. I looked towards where I knew our crew would be working, at least a kilometre down, in the valley. The wind was getting stronger but the snow had eased. As if in answer, the cloud briefly parted allowing me to see down the long sweep of the valley to a silver-grey loch in the distance. I could make out the circle of trees that marked the location of the standing stones, the cherry picker cranes carrying the enormous lights that pretend to be a dim Scottish sun. I even spotted a few black figures, unrecognisable in wet weather gear, moving slowly around. The crew would be cold and wet and only halfway through their day and I felt so fortunate to have the time off. As quickly as they had parted, the clouds closed again and I was alone. It was time to get down, in case the weather got worse and I lost my way.”